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History & heritage
16 Dec 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Birmingham's Hidden Spaces: A look around St Martin's Church (September 2015)

It was September 2015 and Birmingham Heritage Week. Mainly popped into St Martin's Church at the Bullring for The Big Hoot's Little Hoot, but also got these shots. May have also been to do with Birmingham's Hidden Spaces. The visit on the 12th September 2015. Stained glass windows, the Alabaster Tomb and more!

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Birmingham's Hidden Spaces: A look around St Martin's Church (September 2015)





It was September 2015 and Birmingham Heritage Week. Mainly popped into St Martin's Church at the Bullring for The Big Hoot's Little Hoot, but also got these shots. May have also been to do with Birmingham's Hidden Spaces. The visit on the 12th September 2015. Stained glass windows, the Alabaster Tomb and more!


The main reason for this visit was at the time there was various small painted owls inside of St Martin's Church that were part of The Big Hoot's Little Hoot. The trail accompanying The Big Hoot Birmingham 2015 trail. July to September 2015. So this was before the owls were removed and auctioned off for charity.

Here though we will look around the church from the inside.

First look at a pair of stained glass windows. One of these was designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made by William Morris (the window in the south transept).

The next stained glass window close to several memorials on the wall.

The walls around this stained glass window came out dark.

This stained glass window above some stone scultural details.

A bunch of pink flowers with a fan behind (elephant on it). Below is a weaved basket holding the flowers. With white flowers seen below.

This is The Alabaster Tomb.

This is an effigy of Sir John de Bermingham, probably early 15th century. Sir John was a knight who fought in the wars of France from 1373 until his death in 1393. Close inspection of this tomb reveals tiny patches of ancient colouring on the sword belt and on the coat of mail.

Close up of Sir John de Birmingham. Still looking like a Knight after 630 years.

The organ pipes.

WW1 war memorial (1914 - 1918). For the fallen of The Royal Warwickshire Regiment. either side was a pair of Little Hoot owls. Tawney on the left (by King Edward VI Five Ways School), and When I Grow Up on the right (by King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys).

Stone arches holding up the left side of the church.

Interesting looking carved wooden details towards the wooden doors with glass windows.

Plaque on the wall. On Wednesday 23rd March 1887 the St Martin's Society of Change Ringers rung the bells on the visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria on the occasion of the laying of the foundation stone of the Victoria Law Courts (on Corporation Street). The Mayor of Birmingham at the time was Thomas Martineau.

In this room was this centre table with lit candles. You can see that plaque behind.

This wooden carved entrance ways leading to a modern revolving door.

The wooden arched ceiling. Holding up both walls of the church.

Some art on this wall. Looks like ghostly crosses to me.

This leads to the churches cafe. Never been in myself. Was probably rebuilt in the early 2000s when the modern Bullring was built.

A waterfall on these metal table things.

Another bunch of flowers on a curvy yellow and orange base. Near the metal waterfall thing. And one of The Little Hoot owls.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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70 passion points
Art, culture & creativity
12 Dec 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The changing face of street art over the years at the Custard Factory

Over the years I keep returning time and time again to see what the latest street art is painted at the Custard Factory in Digbeth. You can now get on via the gate at Floodgate Street and walk over the footbridge that crosses the River Rea. Then under the Bordesley Viaduct through the car park towards Gibb Street. Every month the giant billboard art changes. From City of Colours to Hi Viz.

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The changing face of street art over the years at the Custard Factory





Over the years I keep returning time and time again to see what the latest street art is painted at the Custard Factory in Digbeth. You can now get on via the gate at Floodgate Street and walk over the footbridge that crosses the River Rea. Then under the Bordesley Viaduct through the car park towards Gibb Street. Every month the giant billboard art changes. From City of Colours to Hi Viz.


Ever changing, the street art always gets painted over. So while the art is gone, the photo of it survives years later.

2013

This view taken on Floodgate Street in Digbeth during Feburary 2013. The Bordesley Viaduct seen crossing from Bordesley towards Birmingham Moor Street Station.

This view taken in July 2013 in what is now the Zellig Car Park. Looks like a pirate!

The Custard Factory chimney in November 2013 painted for Movember by Graffiti 4 Hire. It is still there now (yet to be painted over). You can see it from the Zellig Car Park or from High Street Deritend.

2014

King Kong painted in yellow was outside of The Old Bank on Gibb Street during July 2014. When Adee Phelan opened a salon here. Previously this was Turners Violins. The Clean Kilo is now in this building.

From the gates on Floodgate Street. This is an alternate entrance to the Custard Factory. Heading under the Bordesley Viaduct. This view taken during August 2014. Cross the footbridge over the River Rea and cross into the car park for the short walk to Gibb Street.

In October 2014 to check out the wonderful street art painted at the City of Colours Festival during September 2014. The artist was Jimmy C.

2015

This piece taken on Floodgate Street during January 2015. The artist was Gent. Several skeletons here.

Garfield seen on Floodgate Street during March 2015. Although I previously got a photo of this one in October 2014. The gates to the Custard Factory was closed. This was on the day of the St Patrick's Day Parade 2015.

Birmingham Centre of the Universe. Seen during October 2015. The man at the top is Benjamin Zephaniah. On the left is Felicity Jones (who would go on to star in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story in 2016). This wall regularly gets repainted, usually with giant painted posters adversing something.

2016

The view during April 2016 on Floodgate Street and saw this amazing piece. Not sure of the artist or artists, but was quite close to the Bordesley Viaduct.

The City of Colours Street Art Festival was held again in Digbeth, this time during June 2016. This piece being painted on the wall on Gibb Street. Car park entrance to the right under the Bordesley Viaduct. These artists are amazing. I think it's by Justin Sola (but I'm not fully sure).

Painted gates on Floodgate Street under the Bordesley Viaduct. This entrance to the Custard Factory was closed. Seen in December 2016. This Must Be the Place painted by Caroline Roose. Probably done at the Summer 2016 City of Colours Festival. It was Boxing Day, so the Custard Factory was probably closed.

2017

This was seen during February 2017. The bottom of the Moonlight street art painted movie poster. It won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 2017 Academy Awards. I've not seen this film myself.

Temporary hoardings at the Zellig entrance of Devonshire House. Merry Christmas from Zellig seen in December 2017. Nice image of a snowman.

Blade of the Immortal also seen in December 2017 (same day as above). In the Zellig courtyard area.

2018

The steps from Heath Mill Lane during the snow of March 2018. The walls were very pink down here.

Crossing the River Rea footbridge under the Bordesley Viaduct during April 2018. And I saw this wall painting of a lady with sunglasses. Possibly a piece by Justin Sola (or someone else).

On Gibb Street in July 2018 under the Bordesley Viaduct. "The Bohemian from Balsall Heath". Painted for Odeon Cinemas. The man is probably Odeon founder Oscar Deutsch. R2D2 from the Star Wars movies was played by the late great Kenny Baker. Felicity Jones by now a star thanks to Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. The Beatles probably performed in Birmingham in the 1960s.

2019

Under the Bordesley Viaduct from Floodgate Street during March 2019. The gates to the Custard Factory were open. "Diablo" by Gent 48.

Peaky Blinders returned to BBC One in August 2019 with Series 5. And this piece of Tommy Shelby was on the painted billboard wall at the time. Peakys Fan Art by James Mundy.

Judge Dredd in the Zellig Car Park during October 2019. It was probably painted during the High Viz Street Art Festival, which took place during early September 2019. Saw this during Birmingham Weekender, but I was more interested in the street art.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

 

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60 passion points
Photography
02 Mar 2019 - Jay Mason-Burns
Gallery

Brumgraff:

A look at the ever-changing Street Art on the walls and streets of Birmingham.

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Brumgraff:





A look at the ever-changing Street Art on the walls and streets of Birmingham.


Brumgraff: A Look at the ever-changing Street Art on the walls and streets of Birmingham.

Artist: Annatomix

What follows is a gallery of photographs that I have taken of street art or grafitti art, from around the Birmingham area over the last couple of years.  It's by no means an exhaustive gallery, more simply I guess you could call it an overview of what I have seen and how I have sought to capture this art on camera. Where possible I have given credit to the original artist, but obviously this hasn't always been possible.  

Artist: N4T4

Grafitti is a bit of a dirty word.  People have commonly associated it with loutish behaviour, urban neglect, derelict buildings and the pointless vandalism of public areas. 

Grafitti is, perhaps, the oldest Artform we humans have.  Grafitti has been found dating back to neolithic cave paintings, even the ancient Egyptians and Greeks liked to scrawl their names upon their most majestic of buildings. 

It could be argued that grafitti stems from one of our most basic of urges, to make a mark, to write our names and say 'I was here', to record our progress or to make mockery of authority and express our outrage, boredom or disconnection from society. 

Ultimately Grafitti is an illegal act, the defacing of a wall, building or public space.  Despite our growing tolerance and even veneration for grafitti, it remains a criminal act, and it has to be said there is sadly a lot of grafitti that has little or no merit beyond selfish vandalism. 

There is also no denying that some artists cross the line to get to places they shouldn't necessarily be to display their masterpieces.  But without that endeavour, that willful urge to push the limits, we wouldn't have such beauty. I think you just have to accept the rough with the smooth. Wine tastes good and fills you with good cheer, but the hangover's always a bitch.

 Artist: Lucy McClauchlan 

So, do I love grafitti? Oh gosh yes! Absolutely!!

During the 20th Century, in places like New York, grafitti was an expression of youthful rebellion and social opinion that started out as scrawls on boxcars and subway trains and abandoned buildings in a new form of visual language that appropriated styles and genres to suit whatever a person wanted to say. There were, and are, no limits.  

It took root and spread, becoming a recognised sub-cultural art form that has captured the imagination of artists, photographers and writers alike. In places like Northern Ireland and the Palestinian West Bank, large murals were painted on houses and dividing walls in deeply provocative acts of political resistance and human defiance.  Many of these murals remain today as symbols of political hope and identity. 

I think identity is one of the defining elements of grafitti, it is about people and the places they live in or inhabit, especially in those deprived and abandoned places where the authorities and politicians hold no sway over creative and personal expression. 

What began as (and remains) an illegal activity has evolved into a dynamic and ever changing art form that has made it's way from the streets into galleries and social spaces.  Grafitti is now often referred to as Street or Urban Art. 

At it's heart grafitti is an ephemeral art form, blink and you'll miss it.  It's art that captures the heart and soul of a place and its people.  It's often provocative, in your face, ironic, laugh out loud funny, sometimes immense in size or quietly beautiful.  Local and national heroes are often memorialised whilst other less worthy public figures are mercilessly ridiculed.  It is joyous, touching and sometimes cruel, but that's life. 

Artist: Pahnl

Where I live in Birmingham the street art changes week in week out.  Most mornings on my way to work I detour through the Bournbrook Grounds, a pocket park situated behind the Aldi supermarket in Selly Oak.  It backs on to a large electrical substation, the walls of which act as an enormous canvas for local artists. 

Here the grafitti is tolerated, and consequently it's become a test bed for many local artists to try out new works.  The art changes all the time, it's wonderful. 

Artist: Hoakser

The next few pictures were taken in the park, over the last few months. Sometimes I will see three different pieces painted on the same wall in just a week.  The art is never boring, even if it's not always to my taste.  It's colourful, dynamic, eye catching and always interesting.  It's like a free open air gallery, the smell of fresh paint fills the air, a radio will be blasting out tunes whilst local students play basketball in the park courts.  It's colourful, lively, human. 

When we think of street art in Birmingham most people think of Digbeth and the walls and railway arches surrounding the creative hub at the Custard Factory. 

Since the old Bird's Custard factory was redeveloped as a media and creative centre of excellence in the early 1990s, the whole of Digbeth has undergone an artistic and suburban renaissance, so much so that the street art now defines the identity of the place, intrinsic to what makes Digbeth tick. 

Artist: N4T4

The railway arches, factory walls, entire streets and the canals that snake through the area have become a grafitti paradise where street art, in all it's forms, is not just tolerated but positively encouraged. 

Artist: Goldenboy

Street Art highlights areas like Digbeth, Shoreditch in London and Bedminster in Bristol, giving them a contemporary artistic vibe that attracts tourism and is in tune with the creative types now living and working in the area. 

Artist: Annatomix

Following on from the example of Bristol's Urban Paint festival, Digbeth has cottoned on to the trend for Street art tourism, firstly by staging the City of Colours fest in 2014 and most recently with the highly successful HighVisFest, which is returning later this year. 

Artist: PhilthBlake

Artist: Justin Sola

Artist: Andrew 'Title' Mills

Street Art embraces and subverts all forms of cultural and social discourse, everything is fair game to be depicted, reimagined and used to frame a point of view or simply be a beautiful creation.

Street art can be spray painted, poster paste-ups, tiny stickers on lamposts, even lighting and video installations.  In Birmingham we are blessed with a wealth of street artists who live or visit the city regularly, such as Lucy McClauchlan, Annatomix, PhilthBlake, Dan Newso, Justin Sola, Andrew 'Title' Mills and the inimitable Fokawolf. 

Artist: Lucy McClauchlan

As a photographer and a student of Art I find grafitti, in all it's forms, compulsive viewing and exciting.  Grafitti can literally be anywhere, so it's constantly surprising where it can be seen, on lamposts, trees, bus stops and the dark dirty corners amongst the ruin and detritis of humanity. 

For myself I like to ground my photos of street art in the wider environment, usually by depicting people around it or interacting with it, so in that way it responds to the life around it. 

Street Artist: Justin Sola

I really enjoy walking around Birmingham, capturing the ordinary and everyday scenes that make our city so special.  I think street art really adds spice and colour to our urban landscapes, often rendering contrast against the grey ugliness of destitution, dereliction and neglect.  I think street art is the most singular artistic movement of the modern era, it's the art of the common people, it can be done by anybody and not just by the monied educated few.  I object very strongly to the appropriation of street art by the corporate and business quarters looking to buy their way into hearts and minds, but sadly money always talks. 

Bordesley Junction.

I hope you've enjoyed my little odyssey through the street art of Birmingham. For me it's a joy to witness these works and incorporate them into my work. 

The best way to experience it is in the flesh, so get out there and see it for yourselves. You'll be blown away by the skill and imagination of these people. 

Thanks for reading and if you'd like to see more of my photography you can find me on Instagram and Twitter as @jayjayjjetplane  

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70 passion points
Photography
18 Jan 2019 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

'Digbeth Community 50' - Photography from Birmingham's People with Passion

Take the post for a great selection of 50 photographs from 'People with Passion'. The photography takes you on a non stop tour through the streets of Digbeth, sharing the fantastic street art, the historic buildings, thriving businesses, Custard Factory, art venues & a neighbourhood that has been named the 'coolest' of Birmingham's neighbourhoods! Enjoy!

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'Digbeth Community 50' - Photography from Birmingham's People with Passion





Take the post for a great selection of 50 photographs from 'People with Passion'. The photography takes you on a non stop tour through the streets of Digbeth, sharing the fantastic street art, the historic buildings, thriving businesses, Custard Factory, art venues & a neighbourhood that has been named the 'coolest' of Birmingham's neighbourhoods! Enjoy!


Shaw's Passage - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Bordesley Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

A  letterbox view of Digbeth

Photo by Jay Mason-Burns

The Old Crown Pub

Photo by Elliott Brown

Allison Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Digbeth Street Art

Photo by Chris Fletcher

Winter in Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

December in Digbeth

Photo by Tammie Naughton

St Patricks Day Parade

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Elliott Brown

Well Lane - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Warwick Bar - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

St Patricks Day Parade

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Chris Fletcher

Fazeley Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Curzon Street Station - Digbeth

Photo by Daniel Sturley

Peaky Blinders Eatery - Digbeth

Photo by Elliott Brown

Digbeth bike shop

Photo by Garry Morris

New Bartholomew Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Deretend - Digbeth

Photo by Chris Fletcher

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Damien Walmsley

Custard Factory - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Devonshire House, now Zellig - Digbeth

Photo by Elliott Brown

Custard Factory - Digbeth

Photo by Barry Whitehead

New Bartholomew Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

December in Digbeth

Photo by Chris Fletcher

Custard Factory - Digbeth

Photo by Mac MCreery

The Old Typhoo Building - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Digbeth

Photo by Jay Mason-Burns

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Digbeth

Photo by Jay Mason-Burns

St Patricks Day Parade

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Elliott Brown

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

St Patricks Day Parade

Photo by Elliott Brown

Digbeth Catacombs

Photo by Mac McCreery

The Cut in Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

The Custard Factory - Digbeth

Photo by Jay Mason-Burns

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

St Patricks Day Parade

Photo by Barry Whitehead

Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

The Institutue - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Bordesley Street - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

Street Art in Digbeth

Photo by Chris Fletcher

Digbeth

Photo by Andy Pilkington

Victorian Toilets - Digbeth

Photo by Mac McCreery

 

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50 passion points
Civic pride
29 Dec 2018 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Alfred Bird & Sons: the inventor of eggless custard

You've all seen the Custard Factory building in Digbeth. It was the Devonshire Works and it was here that Alfred Bird the inventor of egg free custard made eggless custard in Birmingham. He invented it in 1837. He soon set up a company Alfred Bird & Sons Ltd which became Bird's Custard. The Bird's had a home in Solihull called Tudor Grange (now near Solihull College).

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Alfred Bird & Sons: the inventor of eggless custard





You've all seen the Custard Factory building in Digbeth. It was the Devonshire Works and it was here that Alfred Bird the inventor of egg free custard made eggless custard in Birmingham. He invented it in 1837. He soon set up a company Alfred Bird & Sons Ltd which became Bird's Custard. The Bird's had a home in Solihull called Tudor Grange (now near Solihull College).


Alfred Bird

He was born in Nympsfield, Gloucestershire in 1811 and died in 1878 in Kings Norton, Worcestershire. He was a pupil at King Edward's School, Birmingham. Alfred invented egg-free custard in 1837 at his chemist shop. It wasn't long before he set up his own company Alfred Bird & Sons Ltd to make the custard. The Custard Factory building we know today was actually built in 1902 by his son Sir Alfred Frederick Bird. The original factory (of the 19th century) no longer exists. Custard was made at the Custard Factory until 1963, when production was moved to Banbury.

Devonshire House seen in 2010 near the end of a renovation that turned the building into Zellig. It was built in 1902 and is a Grade II listed building. Red brick and terracotta with some stone dressings. There is an inscription in the middle that says 'Alfred Bird and Sons Limited', 'Devonshire Works', '1837' and '1902'. 1837 was when the first Alfred Bird invented eggless custard and 1902 when his son opened the Devonshire Works. It is on High Street Deritend, with one side down Floodgate Street. Gibb Street runs through the complex, and Heath Mill Lane is nearby.

To the top of the middle of the building from High Street Deritend is this sculpted part of the building with ships painted onto it. Sailing ships. At the time a gull was sitting on top!

A look down Gibb Street in Digbeth. A Birmingham Civic Society blue plaque for Alfred Bird is on the left. Zellig now occupy the buildings and they have continually been restoring the buildings during the Digbeth 2.0 or "Only in Digbeth" phase. Various different independent shops have occupied the retail units here. As of late 2018, 7 Sins is in the unit on the left. Building on the right used to be a bank. Now it is the Clean Kilo, previously was a hair salon, and before that a music shop. There is also a former library to the rear of the building.

There is an open gate on Floodgate Street under the Bordesley Viaduct that leads to the Custard Factory. A footbridge crosses the River Rea where you can see this view of the Custard Factory. There is a lot of graffiti street art around, this changes quite regularly.

This post is turning into more about the son of the original Alfred Bird. Also called Alfred Bird. Lets head over to Solihull where Alfred Bird Junior lived. Sir Alfred Frederick Bird was born in 1847 in Birmingham and died in 1922 (he was run over by a car in Piccadilly, London). He was also MP for Wolverhampton West. He was elected in 1910 and held the seat until his death. He took over control of his fathers company in 1878 on the death of the first Alfred Bird. He retired as chairman and managing director of the company in 1905.

There is a big manor house off Blossomfield Road in Solihull near Solihull College. It is Tudor Grange House and is a Grade II* listed building. Alfred Bird bought the property in 1901 and lived there until his death in 1922. His widow lived there until her death in 1943. It was being used as Red Cross auxiliary hospital both during and after the Second World War. Warwickshire County Council bought the house in 1946 and became a school for children with special needs until 1976 when it became part of the then Solihull Technical College (now the Solihull College and University Centre). The house was built in 1887 in the Jacobean style by Thomas Henry Mansell of Birmingham for the industrialist Alfred Lovekin. The Lovekin's lived there until Alfred Lovekin's wife died in 1900, and Alfred Bird bought it in 1901. Solihull College put the building up for sale in 2016, and their are plans to convert it into a care home (to secure it's future).

There is a gatehouse near the entrance to the Blossomfield Campus of Solihull College & University Centre. I'm not sure how old it is, but it probably dates to the late 19th century. Would assume it was once part of the Tudor Grange estate that the Bird family owned from 1901 to 1946. At the time I went past it, there was Christmas decorations in front, but were hard to see due to the brick wall, trees and the barrier on the road entrance to the college being in the way. It is a short walk from here to the Blossomfield Road entrance to Tudor Grange Park (also once part of the Bird's Tudor Grange estate).

Solihull College had a modern building built between around 2008 and 2009 turning it into a University Centre (apart from this there isn't an actual University in Solihull Borough). The Headquarters of the Solihull Chamber of Commerce is now based at the college. The car park, normally full of cars during term time was empty during the Christmas and New Year holiday period. They had one of the Big Sleuth bears outside of the college during the Summer of 2017. Called The Gas Street Bearsin (based on the Gas Street Basin).

A look at Tudor Grange Park in Solihull. It has pedestrian entrances via paths on Blossomfield Road, Homer Road (via a path that goes under the Chiltern Railways mainline) and Monkspath Hall Road. The park was formed after Solihull Council purchased the land from the Bird family in 1946. It was formerly farmland. The lands were formerly part of Garret's Green Farm.  Alfred Lovekin bought the farm and built Tudor Grange Hall in 1886. After his death in 1900, the hall and farmland was sold by auction to Alfred Frederick Bird (the then owner of the Bird's Custard company) in 1901. The park opened to the public in the early 1950s.

The land also included what would later become Tudor Grange School (now Tudor Grange Academy) and Alderbrook School. The Bird family gave the land to Solihull on the condition that a school was established on the site. A look at the centre of Tudor Grange Park. Solihull Council has landscaped it around 2008 with new paths, benches and lampposts. There is also a cycle track.

The lake at Tudor Grange Park. Looking towards Tudor Grange Leisure Centre, which was rebuilt in 2008. The original swimming baths in the park opened in 1965, replacing a lido in Malvern Park. There is also an athletics track, that is fenced off from the park, but is I think part of the leisure centre. You would find various geese and ducks in this pond. A stream called the Alder Brook also flows through the park, and the Chiltern Mainline railway passes the park on the east side. Solihull Station is not that far away, as is Solihull Town Centre.

The grounds of Tudor Grange Hall also contained a number of statues which were sold at auction following the death of Mrs Bird (the late wife of the late Alfred Frederick Bird) in 1944. 'The Horse Tamer Group" which was made in 1874 by Joseph Boehm was bought and donated to Solihull Council by Captain Oliver Bird in 1944. The statue was moved to Malvern Park in 1953 where it still stands and is known as 'The Prancing Horse' and is Grade II listed. This view of the statue in early 2010, when the bronze was looking quite green.

In early 2012 metal thieves vandalised the statue and cut off the feet. It was later restored later in 2012, and Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council has security marked the statue in an effort to protect it from future vandalism. After I read about the 2012 vandalism, I returned to Malvern Park in late 2012 to see the statue fully restored. The bronze was looking more black by then.

A winter wonderland scene in Malvern Park during the snow of December 2017. Looked very Christmasy back then. There has been no snow at Christmas 2018, and we haven't had snow since the Beast from the East during March 2018 (which meant we were more likely to have a White Easter than a White Christmas). Mr Horace Brueton had bought the land in 1916 including Malvern Hall. Warwickshire County Council bought Malvern Park from him in 1926, and he gave his remaining land to Solihull in 1944, in the same year that Captain Oliver Bird donated the statue to Solihull.

For more on Malvern Hall see my post on the Manor Houses of the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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